Targeting Microbiota 2020 will be a Virtual and In-Person Congress

We have been closely following updates and evolving guidance from local, national and global agencies for COVID-19. There is still much uncertainty around the coronavirus, and how long our communities may be impacted by the pandemic, but it seems certain that decisions about how we work, travel and gather together will continue to be influenced for weeks and months still to come. Today, we have made the decision to combine In-Person and Virtual conference.

 

If you cannot attend in-person or virtual due to the restriction and time zone difference, you can access on-demand videos to this entire event, including synced audio/video and slides.

All posters will be in PDF format. You can visit them, upload and interact directly with the poster presenter. You can also exchange with speakers via direct or private exchange during the conference.

We will keep you informed of any new decision.

A gut feeling for mental health

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "Matière fécale"

The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds. Jeroen Raes, from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research (VIB-KU Leuven) and his team published these results today in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology.

The relationship between gut microbial metabolism and mental health is one of the most intriguing and controversial topics in microbiome research. Bidirectional microbiota–gut–brain communication has mostly been explored in animal models, with human research lagging behind. Large-scale metagenomics studies could facilitate the translational process, but their interpretation is hampered by a lack of dedicated reference databases and tools to study the microbial neuroactive potential. Surveying a large microbiome population cohort (Flemish Gut Flora Project, n = 1,054) with validation in independent data sets (ntotal = 1,070), we studied how microbiome features correlate with host quality of life and depression. Butyrate-producing Faecalibacterium and Coprococcus bacteria were consistently associated with higher quality of life indicators. Together with Dialister, Coprococcus spp. were also depleted in depression, even after correcting for the confounding effects of antidepressants. Using a module-based analytical framework, we assembled a catalogue of neuroactive potential of sequenced gut prokaryotes. Gut–brain module analysis of faecal metagenomes identified the microbial synthesis potential of the dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid as correlating positively with mental quality of life and indicated a potential role of microbial γ-aminobutyric acid production in depression. Our results provide population-scale evidence for microbiome links to mental health, while emphasizing confounder importance.

To acces the full publication: 
The neuroactive potential of the human gut microbiota in quality of life and depression,  Valles-Colomer et al., Nature Microbiology 2019

Microbiota in the Press & Media

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